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Sometimes I think working in IT Security is at once a blessing and a… - The Veritable TechNinja [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
The Veritable TechNinja

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[May. 10th, 2005|05:28 pm]
The Veritable TechNinja
[status |disappointeddisappointed]
[waveform |Party Ben - Chic Franzie Boys]

Sometimes I think working in IT Security is at once a blessing and a curse. Fucking amateurs on my team can't even figure out how to run a batch process in user space instead of as system on a Win2K server. Others can't figure out what the inherit flag does in NTFS. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot?
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[User Picture]From: raindaisy
2005-05-10 10:00 pm (UTC)
Tango Hotel Alpha Tango, Sierra Uniform Charlie Kilo Sierra!

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[User Picture]From: thehaloproject
2005-05-10 11:59 pm (UTC)
Does that mean that I can get a job too then? Because I don't have any idea what those things are either
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[User Picture]From: arcsine
2005-05-11 12:36 am (UTC)
Heh, I'd rather have newbies I know than newbies I don't. Because I'm such a huge dork, I'll explain both.

Running processes as another user is literally built right in to Win2K's GUI. All you have to do is hold shift and right-click whatever you want to run, select "run as", and authenticate as that user. This allows the process to act like it's the user itself, granting it more access to the system.

The inherit flag is a fundamental and pretty much self-explanatory feature of the NT filesystem. Basically it means that the object has no specific access permissions to itself, but instead inherits the permissions of it's parent folder. Say I put file.txt inside c:\folder, and then changed the permissions of c:\folder to deny anybody but an Administrator rights to open it. As long as I didn't turn off the inherit flag on file.txt, it would have the same permissions as the folder it's in. Same goes for subfolders, and the objects in subfolders, &c.
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[User Picture]From: thehaloproject
2005-05-11 12:44 am (UTC)
ah, that makes sense then. Just because you know some stuff doesn't make you a dork. You should hear me go off on a tangent about lit sometime... it's funny, and dorky, I guess.
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[User Picture]From: arcsine
2005-05-11 04:22 am (UTC)
The sad thing is, I could probably follow the tangent, then go off on my own with a number of equally dorky topics.
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[User Picture]From: recovry
2005-05-11 02:12 am (UTC)
I'm a code monkey and I didn't even know that stuff. Guess thats why I stay out of networking and such.

But I did learn something new tonight. Thanks!
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[User Picture]From: arcsine
2005-05-11 04:25 am (UTC)
Codemonkies don't need to know the filesystem, that's what keeps people like me in a job. It _does_ irritate me to no end when seemingly technically advanced folks can't understand when I try to explain the simple reasons why the server they run their app on hates them, though. As long as you make an effort, I can respect that fact that you could probably write an entire app in Visual Basic before I could even start writing a simple CMD script.
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[User Picture]From: shawboy
2005-05-11 03:50 am (UTC)
I miss the inherit bit. I haven't found anything in Linux like it yet, but then again, I haven't looked hard.
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[User Picture]From: arcsine
2005-05-11 04:22 am (UTC)
Heh, "bit" scares newbies. "Flag" is more descriptive to them. As for JFS/ReiserFS, I still say that they are better suited to application and network services rather than for fileserver use. They are faster, though. Anxious to find out what WinFS does for us Windows wimps in Longhorn.
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[User Picture]From: shawboy
2005-05-11 04:37 am (UTC)
Yea, it should be interesting when it comes out... or if it comes out. :)
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